dark chocolate

Dentists: Best and misfortune of Halloween candy

The Academy of General Dentistry has weighed in on a best and a misfortune of Halloween candies.

Worst:

• Gummy bear-type candies. These are a critical source of tooth spoil since they get stranded in crevices between teeth.

• Sour candies, such as Sour Patch kids candy. They are rarely acidic and can mangle down enamel.

• Sugary candies, such as candy corn. They enclose high amounts of sugar, that can start tooth decay.

Best:

• Sugar-free lollipops. They kindle saliva, that can forestall dry-mouth. A dry mouth allows board to build up.

• Sugar-free gum. This form of resin can forestall cavities by dislodging food particles.

Article source: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/10/31/4951324/dentists-best-and-worst-of-halloween.html

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Thursday, November 1st, 2012 General Dentistry No Comments

The Best (and Worst) Candy for Your Teeth

To: HEALTH AND NATIONAL EDITORS

Contact: Lauren Henderson, Academy of General Dentistry, +1-312-440-4974, media@agd.org

Saving your grin this holiday season

CHICAGO, Oct. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — As any Oct creeps adult on Cindy Flanagan, DDS, MAGD, orator for a Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), her mind always wanders to a volume of candy both children and adults will be immoderate during a final few months of a year.

“Too many candy can means a scary mouth,” says Dr. Flanagan. “People have a bent to graze on a sweetened treats fibbing around the

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/best-worst-candy-teeth-163803624.html

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Tuesday, October 4th, 2011 General Dentistry No Comments

Ernie Kilby finds equine dentistry to be a fast career move

FREDERICK, Md. — The Arabian mare, a grand dim chocolate and cinnamon mix, rose adult on her rear legs to criticism a coming stranger.

She thrashed her conduct from side to side.

She was perplexed and exposed — a 20-something mother-to-be, a usually profound equine here on a Rushing Winds Rescue Farm.

Eight hundred concerned pounds.

Nonetheless, a equine dentist from Windsor walked adult to her sensitively and quietly to ease her jangled nerves.

He reached in and tugged on a steel prop around her muzzle.

She reared again, and he corroborated away.

He waited.

He solemnly led her around her stall.

“It’s OK,” he said, patting the

Article source: http://www.ydr.com/rss/ci_18204139?source=rss

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Sunday, June 5th, 2011 Dentistry No Comments


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