Archive for November 10th, 2011

First Person: Fighting a Possible Recession With Cost Cutting and a Positive Thinking

*Note: This was written by a Yahoo! contributor. Do you have a personal finance story that you’d like to share? Sign up with the Yahoo! Contributor Network to start publishing your own finance articles.

COMMENTARY | According to the Wall Street Journal, economists see a one in three chance the U.S. will slip into recession over the next twelve months. During this Depression of our times, here is how I am keeping a tight control over my expenses, but also keeping my outlook positive and doing my bit for the economy.

Keeping a tight rein on the budget

In the past year, I have reviewed almost every monthly expense and cut unnecessary costs. I have saved on electricity, cell phone service, cable and internet, restaurant outings, entertainment, groceries, baby purchases, car costs, even dentist and prescription medication costs. However, I’ve tried to balance my budget cuts with the happiness and feeling of well-being of my family.

Living by the 50/30/20 rule

Given my humble beginnings and early challenges, I have lived by the 50/30/20 rule for a long time. Of the salary, I spend no more than 50% on fixed costs (including housing and education), 30% on variable or discretionary costs (dining, entertainment, travel, apparel), and save the remaining 20%. I consider any incentive or performance bonus as a windfall and bank the entire amount. This forces me to live within my means.

Not taking employment for granted

My husband’s and my former employers include three companies that were bankrupted or are in upheaval. Many of our former coworkers are amongst the tens of thousands who have lost their jobs in this economy. My father, who is five years from retirement, also recently faced a potential layoff but was fortunately able to find another job. One in 11 Americans looking for a job is now unemployed, and having missed the cut so closely, I do not take employment for granted.

Not paying down the mortgage

Although I am not a fan of being in debt, I consider my mortgage strategic debt, since the rates are low and interest is tax-deductible, without phaseouts. My goal is not to pay down our mortgage, but to have enough savings to be able to pay it in full. Refinancing has saved me over $200 a month, and I am using smart ways of getting a good return on my savings.

Not deferring necessary purchases but getting deals

My shopping wish list ranges from baby gear and clothes to a new kitchen countertop. I isolate the ones that are necessary (a stone kitchen countertop is not) and use a balanced approach. Discounts now abound in discretionary items. So, rather than repair an old broken-down laundry machine, I bought a new one at a deep discount. We also bought a new laptop for $399 to replace one that had broken down (that cost $999). I am also working hard to maintain my appliances in good shape so they don’t break down.

Thinking of others

Although I consider my twice-monthly cleaning service a luxury, thinking of my housekeeper’s three young children prevents me from terminating her. I have increased my working hours so she can keep her job. I negotiated raises for maintenance workers in our building who now put in more hours because of new city recycling rules. Many people have cut back on services (opting for DIY to save money), but I try to weigh my savings against the negative impact of my actions on other people’s lives. Another thing I am trying not to cut back is my charitable spending.

Counting the blessings

Had these tough times happened 10 years ago, I would not have had a financial cushion to support us beyond a couple of months. Incidentally, I also faced the threat of a job loss and a major illness in the family, which scared me into building savings by leading a frugal lifestyle. I am very thankful for the security and good health my family has now. I am counting my blessings and countering the recession through my simple lifestyle and my positive outlook.

More from this contributor:

Putting a Cap on My Dental Costs

How I Save on Prescription and OTC Medications

Credit Card Lessons that I Have Learned

Tags:

Thursday, November 10th, 2011 Salary Of A Dentist No Comments

First Person: Fighting a Possible Recession With Cost Cutting and a Positive Thinking

*Note: This was written by a Yahoo! contributor. Do you have a personal finance story that you’d like to share? Sign up with the Yahoo! Contributor Network to start publishing your own finance articles.

COMMENTARY | According to the Wall Street Journal, economists see a one in three chance the U.S. will slip into recession over the next twelve months. During this Depression of our times, here is how I am keeping a tight control over my expenses, but also keeping my outlook positive and doing my bit for the economy.

Keeping a tight rein on the budget

In the past year, I have reviewed almost every monthly expense and cut unnecessary costs. I have saved on electricity, cell phone service, cable and internet, restaurant outings, entertainment, groceries, baby purchases, car costs, even dentist and prescription medication costs. However, I’ve tried to balance my budget cuts with the happiness and feeling of well-being of my family.

Living by the 50/30/20 rule

Given my humble beginnings and early challenges, I have lived by the 50/30/20 rule for a long time. Of the salary, I spend no more than 50% on fixed costs (including housing and education), 30% on variable or discretionary costs (dining, entertainment, travel, apparel), and save the remaining 20%. I consider any incentive or performance bonus as a windfall and bank the entire amount. This forces me to live within my means.

Not taking employment for granted

My husband’s and my former employers include three companies that were bankrupted or are in upheaval. Many of our former coworkers are amongst the tens of thousands who have lost their jobs in this economy. My father, who is five years from retirement, also recently faced a potential layoff but was fortunately able to find another job. One in 11 Americans looking for a job is now unemployed, and having missed the cut so closely, I do not take employment for granted.

Not paying down the mortgage

Although I am not a fan of being in debt, I consider my mortgage strategic debt, since the rates are low and interest is tax-deductible, without phaseouts. My goal is not to pay down our mortgage, but to have enough savings to be able to pay it in full. Refinancing has saved me over $200 a month, and I am using smart ways of getting a good return on my savings.

Not deferring necessary purchases but getting deals

My shopping wish list ranges from baby gear and clothes to a new kitchen countertop. I isolate the ones that are necessary (a stone kitchen countertop is not) and use a balanced approach. Discounts now abound in discretionary items. So, rather than repair an old broken-down laundry machine, I bought a new one at a deep discount. We also bought a new laptop for $399 to replace one that had broken down (that cost $999). I am also working hard to maintain my appliances in good shape so they don’t break down.

Thinking of others

Although I consider my twice-monthly cleaning service a luxury, thinking of my housekeeper’s three young children prevents me from terminating her. I have increased my working hours so she can keep her job. I negotiated raises for maintenance workers in our building who now put in more hours because of new city recycling rules. Many people have cut back on services (opting for DIY to save money), but I try to weigh my savings against the negative impact of my actions on other people’s lives. Another thing I am trying not to cut back is my charitable spending.

Counting the blessings

Had these tough times happened 10 years ago, I would not have had a financial cushion to support us beyond a couple of months. Incidentally, I also faced the threat of a job loss and a major illness in the family, which scared me into building savings by leading a frugal lifestyle. I am very thankful for the security and good health my family has now. I am counting my blessings and countering the recession through my simple lifestyle and my positive outlook.

More from this contributor:

Putting a Cap on My Dental Costs

How I Save on Prescription and OTC Medications

Credit Card Lessons that I Have Learned

Tags:

Thursday, November 10th, 2011 Salary Of A Dentist No Comments

First Person: Putting a Cap on My Dental Costs

*Note: This was created by a Yahoo! contributor. Do we have a personal financial story that you’d like to share? Sign up with a Yahoo! Contributor Network to start edition your possess financial articles.

Dental costs can emanate vast dents in a wallets of Americans who are not lonesome by dental insurance. Unfortunately, even those who have coverage mostly have to feet a vast bill, as many dental word covers usually a many simple of services. Issues like orthodontics/braces, crowns, caps and dental medicine like base canals tend to be costly since

Article source: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/First-Person-Putting-Cap-My-ac-57979907.html

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, November 10th, 2011 Dental Offices No Comments

First Person: Our Dental Insurance Let Us Down

*Note: This was created by a Yahoo! contributor. Do we have a personal financial story that you’d like to share? Sign up with a Yahoo! Contributor Network to start edition your possess financial articles.

The news from a dentist was not good. The roots on dual of my son’s baby teeth were usually partially dissolved, withdrawal a prolonged stalk that was expected to mangle off in his jaw as a adult teeth came in. Extraction underneath full anesthesia was a usually solution, and it was going to cost $1,200.

We have dental insurance, so we

Article source: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/First-Person-Our-Dental-ac-1849935488.html

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, November 10th, 2011 Dental Offices No Comments

US grant exclusive for UK dementia researcher

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]
Public release date: 9-Nov-2011

[

| E-mail

| Share Share

]

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@pcmd.ac.uk
44-139-268-6107
The Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry

Dr. David Llewellyn from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry is the only UK researcher to receive the New Investigator Research Grant from the Alzheimer’s Association this year

The US-based Alzheimer’s Association has awarded Dr. David Llewellyn of Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, a prestigious two-year $100,000 New Investigator Research Grant to further his dementia research. New Investigator awards are made following international peer review among applicants who are the most promising researchers who have earned their doctoral degrees within the last 10 years.

Dr. Llewellyn is the only researcher in the UK to receive an award from the Alzheimer’s Association in 2011.

Dr. Llewellyn’s goal is to investigate how low vitamin D levels may increase the risk of dementia and neuroimaging abnormalities, such as brain shrinkage in the US Cardiovascular Health Study. Named collaborators on this international project are Professor David Melzer (PCMD), Professor Kenneth Langa (University of Michigan), Dr Paulo Chaves (Johns Hopkins University) and Dr Bryan Kestenbaum (University of Washington). Support from the Alzheimer’s Association will provide funding for a post-doctoral researcher to join Dr. Llewellyn to investigate vitamin D’s potential as a biomarker and therapeutic target.

“It is an honour to receive this Alzheimer’s Association award not only for myself but also for the wider Epidemiology and Public Health group at PCMD and our transatlantic collaborators,” Dr. Llewellyn said. “Support from the Alzheimer’s Association and other funders is vital to accelerate the pace of discovery that we are able to achieve and lay the foundations for our future research programme.”

He added: “Unfortunately, the underlying causes of dementia are still largely unknown and current options for prevention and treatment are limited. However, the high proportion of vitamin D deficiency seen in people with cognitive impairment and dementia may provide us with an important clue. Few foods contain vitamin D, synthesis from sunlight is not possible for much of the year at northern latitudes, and skin becomes less efficient at producing vitamin D with age. Given the coming dementia epidemic, we need to investigate new therapeutic strategies such as vitamin D supplementation as a matter of urgency.”.

In 2011, the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Research Grant Program awarded more than $12.8 million in funding to 78 investigators. Funded projects represent the proposals ranked highest by peer reviewers in an extremely competitive field of 875 applications.

“The Alzheimer’s Association is pleased that, through this research grant, Dr. Llewellyn and his team will continue their innovative research, and we look forward to seeing his advances in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Maria Carrillo, Ph.D., senior director of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer’s Association.

Dr. Llewellyn and his collaborators published the first study to identify a link between low vitamin D levels and the onset of new cognitive problems last year in the leading journal Archives of Internal Medicine, which attracted widespread international media attention. Dr. Llewellyn’s research is also supported by the UK National Institute for Health Research Peninsula Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (PenCLAHRC) and grants from the James Tudor Foundation, the Norman Family Charitable Trust, the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry Foundation, the Age Related Diseases and Health Trust, and the Sir Halley Stewart Trust.

Over 800,000 people in the UK now have dementia and this costs the UK economy 23 billion per year more than cancer (12 billion per year) and heart disease (8 billion per year) combined. The average cost for each person with dementia, 27,647, is greater than the average UK salary. As the population ages the number of people with dementia in the UK will double over the next 30 years, with costs likely to rise to over 50 billion a year. The global burden of dementia is also staggering and more than 115 million people across the globe will suffer from dementia by 2050.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail

| Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Tags:

Thursday, November 10th, 2011 Dentistry No Comments


Search

 
November 2011
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930